Gardening

Indoor planting plan

Indoor planting plan



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No problem! Indoor gardening offers an excellent introduction to the wonderful world of gardening. Most people love plants, but not everyone has the right resources or space to start up a garden. You can always grow plants indoors.

Content:
  • 6 Useful Vastu Tips For Indoor Plants
  • Indoor Garden Design join the Nurture family
  • 21 Best Indoor Plants For Any Location
  • Indoor garden design ideas – types of indoor gardens and plant tips
  • 20 Indoor Garden Designs that Will Bring Life Into the Home
  • These are the 15 easiest indoor houseplants (that won't die on you)
  • 15 Best Indoor Gardening Ideas for Beginners and Advanced Gardeners
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to Grow Indoor Plants - Mitre 10 Easy As Garden

6 Useful Vastu Tips For Indoor Plants

In a hurry? We found the perfect last-minute gifts for all your loved ones. Our editors independently selected these items because we think you will enjoy them and might like them at these prices. If you purchase something through our links, we may earn a commission.

Pricing and availability are accurate as of publish time. Indoor plants not only act as a quick decorating tool , they also help clean the environment and air around them. But if you're worried you have a black thumb, fret not! Note: If you've got kids or pets, be sure to check if the plant is toxic before purchasing.

Why you want it: First of all, this indoor plant has an air-purifying quality that can absorb and strip toxins like formaldehyde from materials in the home like carpet. How neat is that? It has trailing stems and works well in a hanging basket or as a climbing plant with some training onto a trellis or whatever object that will support it.

How to care for it: This indoor houseplant can produce stems that trail 8 feet or longer, so just cut them back when they get too long and your plant will continue to look full and healthy. It can thrive in an array of lighting conditions, but low light may diminish the leaves' variegation. Allow soil to dry somewhat between watering. Pothos does well in an array of normal room temperatures.

Why you want it: This succulent with long, pointed leaves has medicinal properties, as you probably well know. It can also grow 3-feet high to make a big impact indoors.

Smaller varieties, like the popular aloe vera, work great in small, sunny indoor spaces. How to care for it: Aloe likes room temperatures around 70 degrees and a lot of sunlight. As you might expect for a succulent, this indoor houseplant prefers dry soil, so avoid frequent watering for the best results.

Why you want it: These unusual-looking indoor plants add visual interest to a room, and they haven't fallen out of fashion after years of popularity. Spider plants come in a number of varieties and work well as hanging plants. How to care for it: Spider plants do well with evenly moist soil and bright or medium lighting conditions. Room temperatures of 60 to 75 degrees keep them thriving.

Why you want it: There's a real timeless elegance to ivy, and it trails down furniture for a pretty effect. Plus, it's easy to start a new plant for yourself or a friend by cutting off a section of the stem. Think instant hostess gift! OK, not completely instant. It takes about two weeks or so to start growing. How to care for it: English ivy likes moist soil and cooler room temperature conditions, ranging from the mids to about 70 degrees.

Why you want it: For those who love the look of a succulent — not to mention, the ease of care — a jade plant offers thick, lush leaves and visually interesting branches. It grows slowly and has the potential to live from the day your kids are born until their high school graduations It also looks great in a pretty pot when paired with other succulent varieties.

How to care for it: Jade plants don't require a lot of water, so keep soil somewhat dry. It prefers bright light and ordinary room temperatures. Why you want it: This easy-to-grow indoor houseplant will grow into an 8-foot-tall tree for a major pop of greenery in a room. If you prefer a smaller plant, make your rubber tree into a shrub shape by pruning any long stems.

Extra bonus: The dark green leaves have an attractive shiny finish. How to care for it: Allow the surface of the rubber tree's soil to dry out in between watering. It thrives in lighting conditions from medium to bright, and a range of room temperatures between about 60 and 80 degrees.Why you want it: The leaves of this pretty indoor plant can grow up to a foot long, and provide a tropical-looking accent to home decor.

The whole plant can grow 6-feet high for a cheery room focal point. How to care for it: Dieffenbachia thrives in normal room temperature not colder than the mids. Keep the soil evenly moist, and provide medium or low-lighting conditions for the best result. Why you want it: Surely you've seen this indoor houseplant in many homes, since it has such pretty, curving white blooms and dark leaves and it's easy to grow. How to care for it: This houseplant favors low humidity and also low light, making it great for rooms with few windows.

It prefers moist soil throughout the pot and tolerates standard temperatures to about 85 degrees. Why you want it: It doesn't get much easier than this indoor houseplant — also known as mother-in-law's tongue. It has variegated leaves that grow upright, and some varieties have yellow or white edges. It has small, white flowers that bloom only rarely. How to care for it: This indoor plant grows well in a whole range of lighting conditions. The air should be somewhat dry, as should the soil.

Any normal room temperature should suit it just fine. Why you want it: This indoor tree has shiny leaves to add cheer to any indoor space. Its stems can be braided for a tidy topiary effect we love. How to care for it: This tree likes full sun or at least bright, filtered light.

Most varieties there are about ! Room temperatures between 65 to 75 degrees work best. Why you want it: This is a trailing indoor houseplant that loves to make its way down mantles or bookshelves. Its perky, dark green leaves come to a heart shape where they meet the stems. How to care for it: This may be the quintessentially easy indoor plant. It thrives in a range of lighting conditions, from low to sunny, preferring indirect light.

It does well anywhere close to standard room temperature. Let the surface of the soil dry between watering; it should not be constantly wet. Why you want it: A whole array of small indoor houseplants with textured, shiny, often colorful leaves fit into this category.

Some popular, attractive and easy-to-manage indoor varieties include watermelon, red-edge and ripple peperomias. How to care for it: Peperomias favor indoor temperatures from about 60 to 75 degrees and medium or low-lighting conditions.

The surface of the soil should dry out between watering. Why you want it: This jaunty indoor houseplant has bright green leaves that look like shamrocks, plus sweet white flowers on tall stems. How to care for it: This houseplant loves bright but indirect or filtered light. Allow the soil to dry out a bit between watering thoroughly about once per week. Why you want it: This lovely indoor tree actually a species of ficus has large, dark green leaves that seem to form the vague outline of a fiddle or violin — that's how it got its name.

How to care for it: This indoor plant likes room temperatures between about 65 and 75 degrees, and exposure to bright to medium light. The surface of the soil should dry out slightly between watering. If it starts to look a bit pale, try moving it to somewhere less bright.

Why you want it: This pretty indoor house palm is a great inspiration if you're dreaming of tropical climates — or just trying to conjure the look in your home decor. It can grow to about 7-feet tall for a dramatic touch in a room, but a smaller pot will keep it contained if you'd like it to stay smaller. How to care for it: The areca palm does well in indirect light. Keep the soil somewhat dry, only watering on alternate weeks or so.

Alesandra Dubin is a Los Angeles-based writer, Village's chief lifestyle blogger and the founder of home and travel blog Homebody in Motion. IE 11 is not supported.

For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser. Share this —. Follow today. More Brands. How to protect your garden when cold weather rolls around Aug. By Alesandra Dubin.

Pothos Ivy. The Sill. Home Depot. See this NYC apartment with more than plants Oct.


Indoor Garden Design join the Nurture family

Living in a small apartment and being a gardening enthusiast were once mutually exclusive. The too-often dark , damp, or overly dry environments are not exactly the most ideal for those looking to turn their living room into a makeshift greenhouse. However, this no longer needs to be the case, as there is a wide array of plant species that are actually perfectly suited for surviving—and even thriving—in less-than-tropical conditions. Read on for his top picks, as well as some of our own. When it comes to light, it likes it bright or medium and indirect.

5 Steps to Indoor Plant Success · Healthy soil is important when growing in a limited area. · Select a container that has enough capacity to house the roots of.

21 Best Indoor Plants For Any Location

In a hurry? We found the perfect last-minute gifts for all your loved ones. Our editors independently selected these items because we think you will enjoy them and might like them at these prices. If you purchase something through our links, we may earn a commission. Pricing and availability are accurate as of publish time. Indoor plants not only act as a quick decorating tool , they also help clean the environment and air around them. But if you're worried you have a black thumb, fret not! Note: If you've got kids or pets, be sure to check if the plant is toxic before purchasing.

Indoor garden design ideas – types of indoor gardens and plant tips

If you too love indoor gardening like we do! Source: Ikea. The space between windows can also be prime real estate for growing, just like this one in the picture above. You can use wall mounted storage to keep the pots to decorate your home with plants.

With the recent growing appeal of tiny homes and smaller, minimalistic spaces, there are many ways to achieve a wonderful garden in a very small space.

20 Indoor Garden Designs that Will Bring Life Into the Home

It seems we can't get enough of lush green rainforest plants. We want them cascading down bookcases, sitting cutely on coffee tables and stretching gracefully towards our ceilings. Hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of gorgeous greenery is getting composted each year after it finally gives up the ghost, leaving small armies of wannabe growers to carry their guilt like a secret Nickelback fan club membership. It's not just the money, it's the effort, not to mention your hopes and dreams for an Insta-perfect indoor plant oasis. Architect and interior designer Jason Chongue is known as 'the plant whisperer' and has a huge following on Instagram, where he shares shots of his inner-city pad, packed to the rafters with plants.

These are the 15 easiest indoor houseplants (that won't die on you)

With a long piece of wood, paint, screws, galvanized metal tape, jars, herbs, and potting soil, you can place this hanging herb garden on a kitchen or breakfast nook wall. Create a cool design on the wooden strip with paint and then attach the jars with the galvanized metal tape and screws. Fill the jars with herbs, like in the photo, or succulents or air plants. Get instructions here. An on-trend terrarium is one of the easiest and most low-maintenance ways to bring plants indoors.

Indoor plants, vertical gardens, and courtyards in the office have more benefits than just aesthetics.

15 Best Indoor Gardening Ideas for Beginners and Advanced Gardeners

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. The pandemic did more than increase our time spent on Zoom ; people's interest in gardening also skyrocketed.

RELATED VIDEO: Beginner's Guide to Indoor Plant Care

Give your home a spring-time glow all year round with some potted pretties on your coffee table. Rhipalis far left , Boston fern front left and Plumosus fern back left are fitted in organic clay pots for a sweet console table display. Most house plants will look their best when they are able to receive lots of natural light. One way to give your plants the light they need without the dreaded crammed corner is by hanging them from the ceiling. These hanging planters look especially pretty placed in front of a paneled mirror.

May 08, 5 min read. Original Article provided by Mekaila Oaks of Redfin.

Looking for a unique gift for a friend or loved one? Our range of high quality and easy to use gardening solutions help people grow food and indoor plants! We've put together a christmas gift guide for you! Our range of simple indoor gardens use hydroponic technology and LED Grow lights, which will empower you to grow herbs and leafy greens in no time. With low water consumption and built-in light timers, these kits are the best low maintenance way to grow food from the comfort of your own kitchen! Struggling to grow house plants? Not enough direct sunlight?

Please select your shipping region. Deck the halls and homes of loved ones with flavorful herbs, nutritious greens, exciting veggies and beautiful flowers. The smart garden does all the work for you.